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Can Life Prevail? by Pentti Linkola

Very rarely does a book make you feel good about receiving bad news. Usually, there’s something you fear so much that you want anything but to face it. But if someone is able to explain in clear steps what you must do to face it, and how the other side is indeed brighter, it lessens the burden. With decreased resistance and doubt comes greater effectiveness, and you may emerge with more triumph than suspected possible. Can Life Prevail? is one such book.

Conservatism Inc. by James Kirkpatrick

Reading Conservatism Inc.: The Battle for the American Right helps solidify our knowledge of the future. It transforms certainty of defeat into a commitment to victory, realizing that attempting a Buckleyite removal of that which offends others will not work, and that we have to steam straight ahead into battle knowing that it will polarize, divide, and perhaps shatter the United States. […] A pleasant read, owing in part to its division into smaller pieces, it presents us with the type of certainty that comes from knowing what does not work, and why it was doomed, which allows us in turn to look toward the future as a place where actual conservatism can exist.

Conservatism Inc. by James Kirkpatrick

James Kirkpatrick, columnist for VDare.com and The Social Contract Quarterly, spent years within a conservative movement that now has no place for him, but readers of his new book Conservatism Inc. will be the beneficiaries of their folly. No one knows that gutless, cowardly gang of careerists better than he does. […] The pieces are short and punchy, ideal especially for younger readers getting up to speed on America’s current situation and the nationalist response.

Conservatism Inc. by James Kirkpatrick

I started reading Conservatism Inc. in the midst of the “Groyper Wars,” in which young men on the Dissident Right publicly confronted conservative figures such as Charlie Kirk, Ben Shapiro, Matt Walsh, and Dan Crenshaw — Conservative Inc. to a man — during their college speaking tours. Questions about race, immigration, and demographic change left these men sputtering about “racism” and “white nationalism,” and sounding just like the leftists they are supposedly fighting.

The Long Goodbye by Vincent Joyce

A strong debut. Highly recommended. The characters are interesting and credibly portrayed … and face the same challenges as ourselves, like loss, revenge and love, which gives the story a deeper dimension … [E]xciting, and the battle scenes are deadly realistic. At the same time, the insight into Japanese culture and bushido is very much appreciated.

The Fourth Political Theory by Alexander Dugin

In this episode, I look at Russian philosopher and geopolitical strategist Alexander Dugin’s vision of a new political order to replace both liberalism and its natural culmination, post-liberalism. I mention the need to differentiate a specifically American version of the fourth political theory, moving toward a position of pragmatic eclecticism that can absorb some of the disjointed remnants of liberalism that infuse our Constitution and society.

The Sweet-Scented Manuscript by Tito Perdue

Tito Perdue is, without question, one of the most important contemporary Southern writers we have—and should certainly be considered among the most important American writers of the early 21st century. This new novel of his is an absolute delight.

Ethnic Apocalypse by Guillaume Faye

In his last book, published in 2019, Faye describes how our continent has been affected by mass immigration, and predicts a dark future for Europe and the West. If the peoples of Europe don’t simply submit to the new colonisers, Faye sees a civil war coming, that can either be won or lost.

The Sweet-Scented Manuscript by Tito Perdue

This is one to be read slowly, relishing every sentence like a rich dessert wine… this is a magical love story, cute, visceral, and absorbing, with a caliginous dreamlike atmosphere, a charismatic voice, clever dialogue, and endearing characters so real that they almost feel like personal friends. Indeed, one is almost able to inhale the distinctive air of that time and place, almost a witness to events, rather than a reader from cynical postmodernity, half a century removed… the story is told in a terrifically amusing manner, and every page is a constellation of little gems… One is sad to reach the end.

Ethnic Apocalypse by Guillaume Faye

In this episode of Interregnum, we are joined by Constantin von Hoffmeister, Johannes Scharf, and Guillaume Faye’s own French editor, Daniel Conversano, to discuss the last book which Faye finished before his death, Ethnic Apocalypse: The Coming European Civil War. We consider this book directly in the context of the social, political and ethnographic situation of various parts of Europe, and weigh the merits of Faye’s predictions.

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