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For a Positive Critique by Dominique Venner

Venner’s abstractions about the goals of the revolution are in contrast to the concreteness of his revolutionary methods. He wrote, first of all, that there must be a clear, coherent doctrine. This motivates activists and wins over waverers. The doctrine must be simple and convincing enough to unite all revolutionaries. Venner writes that activists fail to act in unison because their doctrine is unclear: “Revolutionary unity is impossible without unity of doctrine;” “the development of new doctrine is the only answer to the divisions between activists.”

On the Fortunes and Misfortunes of Art in Post-War Germany by Hans-Jurgen Syberberg

This book is a call for a return to origins, to nature, and the rural basis of life; the suppressed foundation of “blood and soil,” for an ecology that nobody of the Green-Left could comprehend let alone write. It is a valuable contribution to the conservative-revolution that shows the anti-capitalist character intrinsic to any such revolt, and the conservative character of anything genuinely revolutionary.

Travels in Cultural Nihilism: Some essays by Stephen Pax Leonard

Journeying through this troubled intersection of politics and culture, Travels in Cultural Nihilism might make the reader cry, fume, and even laugh. By the end, though, such contradictory reactions seem salutary and necessary, matching the spirit of the times, and perhaps even adding up to an enlightening journey we all need to experience.

The Real Right Returns by Daniel Friberg

Zum Beleg fokussiert das Damenpaar vom Bevölkerungschen Beobachter den Schweden Daniel Friberg, seines Zeichens Leiter des Arktos-Verlags. Nun kenne ich den ein bißchen besser als das ZDF; Friberg ist mitnichten »in Schweden vorbestraft wegen Körperverletzung und Volksverhetzung«, sondern wurde lediglich aufgrund einer Publikation über Ausländerkriminalität wegen “Rassismus” angezeigt und vor Gericht freigesprochen.

A Handbook for Right-Wing Youth by Julius Evola

I would wager that many of those who consider themselves to be part of the AltRight will find common ground with Evola (whether it be very little or a lot). Where the book shines is in its clearly defined portrayal of Evola’s principles and the manner in which these should be integrated by any movement that considers itself as part of the real Right. Food for thought at the very least.

The National Rifle Association and the Media: The Motivating Force of Negative Coverage by Brian Anse Patrick

The explanation of the NRA’s growth mobilization paradox is what will prove of most value to those in the Outer Right. Those thinking of how to build powerful, resilient movements to maintain the best aspects of our civilization would do well to give The National Rifle Association and the Media a close reading. The potential to build a powerful identity-based grouping such as the NRA is arguably easier now than ever before and the conditions have never been riper for those interested in building public institutions that engage with the normal political process around specific wedge issues. For that task, this book is a valuable primer.

Dissident Dispatches: An Alt-Right Guide to Christian Theology by Andrew Fraser

Dissident Dispatches is the record of his experiences as a student. The book includes papers written for course credit (with his lecturer’s comments), accounts of his skirmishes with the politically correct, and subsequent personal reflections on both. It is arranged chronologically rather than thematically, giving it the feel of a miscellany, but a consistent theological and political perspective underlies the whole. Weighing in at over 500 pages, the volume is best digested in short installments. What follows is merely a summary of a few of the main themes.

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