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Constantin von Hoffmeister explores the utopian vision of “Imperium” proposed by Francis Parker Yockey, highlighting the connection to Jean Baudrillard’s theories on the divergence between reality and simulation in a disillusioned society.

This article was originally published here.

In the wondrous world of Francis Parker Yockey’s mind, a magical land called “Imperium” loomed like a delectable and glorious mirage, an invocation of a utopian society where people were united by their ancestral heritage and shared cultural values. He believed that the corrupt and decaying modern society had lost its way and that people had become estranged from one another and from the primordial essence of existence.

In a manner akin to the sinister insights of the mad prophet Abdul Alhazred, Yockey’s ideas echoed the words of French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, who spoke of a world that had become unhinged from reality and severed from its ancient roots. Yockey called for a return to traditional values, shunning the materialistic trappings and banal consumerism of modernity, as a way of unlocking the sanguineous secrets of the past. Baudrillard’s idea of reality challenges the traditional notion of an objective reality that is independent of human perception. According to Baudrillard, reality is not something that can be objectively known or understood but is rather a construct of human interpretation and simulation. In other words, what we understand as “reality” is not a direct representation of the world around us but is rather shaped by our own cognitive processes and cultural influences. Simulation involves assembling a hyperreal version of reality, where the simulation may become more real than reality itself.

In the case of Yockey’s conceptualization of an Eden where all Europeans can co-exist in peace, we can see a connection to Baudrillard’s ideas. Yockey’s mental vista, like any other vision of paradise, is a configuration of human imagination and desire, and its realization is dependent on the interpretation and simulation of individuals and society as a whole. Furthermore, Yockey’s call for a novel approach that combined different strands of thought and perspectives can be seen as an attempt to break away from the traditional categories and structures that shape our perception and interpretation of reality. Yockey’s goal of a unified Europe may be a longing to create a new reality, one that is not constrained by the boundaries of nation-states, ideologies, or cultural differences. In this sense, Yockey’s vision is an example of the postmodern condition that Baudrillard describes, where reality is not fixed and objective but rather a fluid and constantly evolving framework of human interpretation and simulation.

Yet Yockey was under no illusions that realizing his auspicious prophecy of “Imperium” would entail a monumental upheaval of society that included cold confrontations and bestial beheadings. He called for a new ruling class, an elite coterie of individuals who would be steeped in the blackest and purest of arts and who would be consumed by a fanatical desire to bring forth a new world order. These chosen few would need to abandon their petty personal interests and toil endlessly towards the creation of a society that was governed by principles of cosmic justice, absolute hierarchy, and unspeakable terror for all.

Yockey was entranced by the potent and sagacious Stalin, believing that he held the key to realizing his blueprint of a grand and wondrous “Imperium.” He revered Stalin’s commanding presence and unyielding rule, and was convinced that his zealous efforts to build factories and modernize the land would bring about a formidable and cohesive nation.

Yockey’s admiration for Stalin’s strength and leadership did not blind him to the limitations of the Soviet Union’s ways. In his view, the focus on Marxist-Leninist ideology had become a stagnant force, hindering the Soviet Union’s progress towards achieving its full potential. Yockey saw an opportunity for the Soviet Union to transcend its ideological constraints and embrace a new approach that blended traditional, imperial, and revolutionary ideas. To Yockey, the Marxist-Leninist ideology was a thing of the past that could not keep up with the changing times. He believed that a new way of thinking was necessary to achieve the goal of “Imperium.” Yockey’s idea was not just for the Soviet Union but for all of Europe and Russia, and he saw the potential for a new era of progress and unity if the right ideas could be put into action.

In his fevered dreams, Yockey yearned for a time when the Soviet Union and Europe could merge together to form a two-ocean entity. But he knew that such a marriage would be fraught with peril, for the rigid dogma of Soviet ideology would need to be cast aside to embrace a more fluid and intuitive way of thinking. In his mind’s eye, Yockey saw a Europe where the borders of nations dissolved and where Europeans could come together as one, sharing a deep sense of trust and a propensity for prosperity. But he knew that this vision would require a profound sacrifice and that the road ahead would be long and arduous.

One day, Yockey found himself embroiled in a major conflict. The Red Wizards, who sought to impose their will upon the world, were battling against the White Wizards, who fought to preserve freedom and independence. Yockey, who had long envisioned a Europe where all could live together in toil and aspiration, was drawn to the side of the White Wizards.

In the mysterious realm of magic, the Red Wizards held great power, but the White Wizards were not to be underestimated. They fought valiantly, using their knowledge of spells and incantations to push back against the shadowy forces. Yockey, who had dedicated his life to the study of the arcane, was able to lend his expertise to aid the White Wizards in this engagement. The clash between the two factions was fierce, and the air was filled with the crackling energy of spells being cast. Yet, despite the odds, the White Wizards emerged victorious. The Red Wizards were forced to flee to the outer realms, defeated and disgraced. With the threat of the black magic lifted, the world breathed a sigh of relief, and peace was restored once more. In recognition of his bravery and skill, Yockey was bestowed with the highest honor a magician could receive. The king himself knighted him and granted him a seat at the royal court, where he was regarded as a formidable leader and a master of the magical arts.

Yockey traveled through forests and mountains, enduring the biting cold and sweltering heat. He crossed rivers and deserts, encountering all manner of creatures along the way. He fought off goblins and trolls, outsmarted cunning fairies, and outwitted shape-shifting creatures. As he traveled, Yockey met other brave warriors who shared his vision of a cooperative West. They joined him on his journey, forming a sizeable following that became more confident with each passing day. However, Zarathron’s power was immense, and his army of darkness seemed to grow stronger at a rapid pace. The White Wizards knew that they needed to use all their supernatural abilities to defeat the dark lord. Yockey studied the ancient texts and honed his magical skills, preparing for the final showdown. He knew that he would need to summon all his courage and might to defeat the enemy.

The fighting was fierce and brutal, and the fate of occidental mankind hung in the balance. The ground shook as powerful spells were cast, and the sky was filled with the deafening roar of dragons and other beings. In the end, the White Wizards and their army emerged victorious. Zarathron and his minions were banished to the phantom realms, and the world was once again becalmed. Yockey and his fellow warriors were hailed as heroes, and their vision of a pacified continent seemed within reach.

Yockey’s unrelenting desire for a consolidated European super-state consumed him, and he tirelessly expounded on his teachings even in the face of staunch opposition. His vision of an enchanted realm where all Western souls could coexist in brave and martial tranquility inspired many, even as it ruffled the feathers of his detractors. Despite the controversy surrounding his ideas, his legacy remains, perpetuated by scholars and activists who remain spellbound by his ideology. It is uncertain if the world will ever witness the manifestation of his magical “Imperium,” but Yockey’s unwavering dream lives on, igniting a spark of hope in the hearts of those who dare to believe in the impossible. Perhaps one day, his dream of another Europe where all inhabitants can live in harmony will come true, the dragons and ogres will be tamed, and the power of the Ring will be forever broken.

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Constantin von Hoffmeister

Constantin von Hoffmeister studied English Literature and Political Science in New Orleans. He has worked as an author, journalist, translator, editor and business trainer in India, Uzbekistan and Russia. You can subscribe to his newsletter here: https://eurosiberia.substack.com

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Alexander Raynor
Member
7 months ago

Though there is not any strong evidence for it (direct citations, references, etc), it is likely that Yockey planted the seeds of what would become the European New Right. He is one of a handful of key figures in the post-war right that served as a bridge between inter-war and post-war right-wing thought.

The Soviet Union is no more but Russia is still the key towards a great geopolitical entity that is capable of withstanding the hegemony of American-led Liberalism. Imperium is a must-read. His vision is still the dream – a United Europe where Europeans can once again start living historically.

Jason Rogers
Member
Jason Rogers
7 months ago

I’m not overly familiar with Yockey, but one of the surprising things about Léon Degrelle (Belgian SS officer exiled in Spain) is that later in life, Degrelle also hoped for a leader to emerge who would unite Europe against her enemies and against US domination and that – in Degrelle’s opinion – the leader would likely be from Russia. What is surprising is that Degrelle, much like the Führer whom he admired – hated the Soviet Union; he had spent almost all of his time during the war on the eastern front fighting communists. And yet he foresaw Russia playing a major role in united and saving Europe.

So there is a link to be made between the post-war Right and the New Right..

RWBB
Member
7 months ago
Reply to  Jason Rogers

I wonder if Degrelle and Yockey ever communicated?

Jason Rogers
Member
Jason Rogers
7 months ago

What a unique introduction to Yockey. As a follow-up article, it would be nice to have a succinct summary of Yockey’s thought and vision.

Atlantean
Member
7 months ago

The biography of Yockey, Dreamer of the Day is a must-read that reveals how interesting he was as a person and also looks at the networks he inspired directly or indirectly. My first activism was in the reborn European Liberation Front, which was named for Yockey’s movement, and Dugin was a part of. Yockey’s influence on Thiriart and Dugin is undeniable.

Neil Bucklew
Neil Bucklew
7 months ago

we have declared total war upon reality because we must.

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